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Book Review: The Strong Women Who Lead the Way

She’s relatively well known at this point, but I stumbled upon Jeanette Winter’s book The Librarian of Basra at the closing of an art show featuring the silk road. It was my first year of teaching, and they were selling huge bolts of satin fabric, perfect for my bulletin boards. There, in the middle of the room, was a copy of the Librarian of Basra. No dust jacket. On sale for $5.

That was a little more than I would usually pay for a used book, but something about the book grabbed me, and I added it to the mounds of fabric and brought it to check out. I didn’t know it at time, but I had just found my new favorite picture book author and illustrator.

Jeanette Winter has written and illustrated many books. My favorite of her books are biographies about various women of note. In honor of Women’s History Month, here are a few of my favorite titles, featuring three brave women:

The_Librarian_of_BasraThe Librarian of Basra: This book was my first introduction to Jeanette Winter. In it, she tells the story of Alia Muhammad Baker, a librarian in Iraq. When the Iraq war started, Alia could not get the officials in her city to approve the relocation of the library. With incredible bravery, she took matters into her own hands. This story tells of one woman’s courage to fight for what she knew was right. The pictures show some very important images of war, which always capture my students’ attention, and leads to meaningful discussion.

indexWangari’s Trees of Peace: Not knowing my budding appreciation of Winter, my mother bought this book for my students after reading about Wangari Matthai’s incredible testimony of bringing back green to her homeland of Kenya with the simple and powerful act of planting trees. Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, this book tells her story, and like Alia Muhammad Baker, details the bravery and courage it takes to stand up for change. Along with the book, my mother sent a package of dates, since many of the trees planted were date trees. Not all of my students were convinced, but it was fun to try something new.

georgiaoGeorgia: Β In Georgia, Winter tells the story of Georgia O’Keefe, starting from when she was a small child, and going through until her death. Though her story of bravery is somewhat different from Alia’s and Wangari’s, Winter explains how she was willing to stay true to who she knew she was, despite that necessitating going against the grain. “When my sisters wore sashes-I didn’t. When my sisters wore stockings-I wore none.” This is an excellent book to use to celebrate the beautiful creations that come from being willing to leave the crowd and march to the beat of your own drum.

Like I said, Winter has many, many books. I get excited each time I see a new hardcover picture book with her name printed on the spine. They are well worth making a trip to the local library or bookstore to check out.

Intended ages: 8 and up

261755_10150290602379874_2436766_nRachel

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4 Comments

  • Reply
    aminchicago
    March 10, 2014 at 5:31 pm

    So happy to know about these books -and if you’re sharing them with your students, they’ll be age-appropriate for my kids. Will put them on hold with the library now!

    • Reply
      Rachel
      March 10, 2014 at 7:52 pm

      I hope they like them as much as I do! I imagine they will. πŸ™‚

  • Reply
    aminchicago
    March 10, 2014 at 5:31 pm

    So happy to know about these books -and if you’re sharing them with your students, they’ll be age-appropriate for my kids. Will put them on hold with the library now!

    • Reply
      Rachel
      March 10, 2014 at 7:52 pm

      I hope they like them as much as I do! I imagine they will. πŸ™‚

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