Education friendship Teaching

The Many Shades of Appreciation

100_0212(Student Self Portraits)

It’s Teacher Appreciation Week. It’s the week when teachers get catered lunch and are brought balloons and homemade cards by their students. The week rife with platitudes like: “I touch the future, I teach.” And, “I teach, what’s your superpower?”

It’s not that I dislike those phrases or want to take away from the hard work we do everyday, but it’s just those phrases don’t really capture the day to day monotony and ordinary-ness that it is to be a teacher. Most days I am much less aware of my permanent impact on the future, and much more aware of how my teacher training did very little in the way of preparing me for how to handle a student who leaves the room Jerry Maguire style, pointing at each of us in the room and calling, “You’re a butt cheek, and you’re a butt cheek, and you’re a butt cheek.”

Or reflecting on how I never really figured out the right response on my first day of teaching to my seventh grade student, who looked me up and down at 2:45pm when school was finally dismissing (after an excruciating six hours)  and said, “Nice ass.”

And I’m not really thinking about my “superpower” when I am screaming at my students because the fifth stupid pencil sharpener has fallen to the floor, scattering dusty lead and wood chip shavings all over the floor, and five boys have rushed the broom in an effort to be helpful and are now arguing over who is the sweeper for the week. The answer is almost always none of them.

What I do as a teacher definitely matters. But I don’t generally get to see the impact of what I do.

However, there’s a very good chance that this will be my last year in the classroom, at least for awhile, and those sorts of monumental changes and decisions leave me reflective, ruminating on what has been and thoughtful about my legacy. These sorts of goodbyes have a way of crystalizing moments as they happen, recognizing that they may be the last of their kind.

Which is how I felt the moment on Wednesday when Lenaeya walked into my room before school and asked if she could tell me something she hadn’t told anyone.

I closed my computer, looked her in the eye, and said, “Of course. What’s going on, Lenaeya?”

“My dad is in jail. He just got sent to jail.” Her eyes were sad, vulnerability evident in her voice.

I asked her what happened, what details she knew. She didn’t know much. Just that her summer plans to stay with her father had been cancelled. After only five minutes of talking she was already late for class. (Schedules do tend to get in the way of the important things in life.) So I asked her if she wanted to have lunch with me so she could talk more and also write her dad a letter.

At lunch I pulled out the notecards I keep handy for emergencies such as this one and took out the special inky pens I keep sacred and hidden and let her write her feelings and thoughts for her dad. I found myself thoroughly enjoying my shared lunch with my ten year old friend, fully engaged in her concerns about her father, her classmates, her friendships. I helped her spell the words she didn’t know and we sealed the envelope with the message for her dad.

Two days later Lanaeya and I were sitting in my classroom again when Alex, my favorite kindergarten student, flung open the door, breakfast in hand, tear-streaks on his face, wailing at the top of his lungs. We both turned to him as he crossed the room and flung himself into my arms. I asked him what was wrong and he just shook his head. Meanwhile Lanaeya, ever ready in crisis, left to the bathroom to get him some tissue.

While Lanaeya was gone, Alex stood crying. I was finishing some paperwork I needed to get done when he sobbed, “My dad is going back to jail!” The pain in my eyes must have been evident because when I closed my computer (which seems to always be open) and turned to him to say I was sorry, he broke down all over again. While helping him dry his face with the tissues Lanaeya had brought back, I mentioned that he didn’t have to talk to her, but he might want to share what he was going through with Lanaeya because she had been dealing with similar things.

At first he shook his head no, but then stopped and said quietly, “My dad is going to jail.”

Without missing a beat, Lanaeya said, “My dad is in jail, too. Here Alex, do you want to write him a letter? That’s what I do when I’m feeling sad.” Then she took out some extra note cards from our lunch and wrote while he dictated a letter to his father. They talked together about what it felt like to have a father in jail. And I became completely unnecessary, getting out of their way, as a good teacher does.

And that’s the thing about teaching. Most days are just days, like every other. But then the platitude becomes real, the hackneyed phrase shows up in your classroom in the form of a girl extending kindness to a young boy. Every once in awhile a lesson sticks. And if you’re lucky, it’s an important one. And if you’re really lucky, it happens enough to keep you teaching even when the air conditioner is broken in your classroom and the sewage system has backed up, necessitating bag lunches for a week. (Yes, these things have actually happened.)

After Alex finished making his card for his father, I said, “I know this is a really hard time, Alex, but sometimes it helps me to know that even when I’m going through hard times I am not alone.”

“Yeah, like I have my brother and my mom,” Alex agreed.

“And you have Lanaeya and me,” I added.

“Are you my friend, Lanaeya?” Alex asked, turning shyly to her.

“Yes, Alex, I’m your friend,” she said. She grabbed his hand and walked him back to class.

Being witness to these moments doesn’t make me a superhero. But these moments are what I love most about teaching, what I will miss most when I leave.

And maybe sometimes I do have the privilege to touch the future.

261755_10150290602379874_2436766_nRachel

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10 Comments

  • Reply
    Kristi Middleton
    May 9, 2014 at 5:26 am

    Rachel,
    You are a really good writer! I enjoy reading your blog very much! You could write regularly for a newspaper. Excellent work!

    • Reply
      Rachel
      May 9, 2014 at 11:19 pm

      Thanks, Kristi! I’m glad you’re enjoying it. 🙂

  • Reply
    Kristi Middleton
    May 9, 2014 at 5:26 am

    Rachel,
    You are a really good writer! I enjoy reading your blog very much! You could write regularly for a newspaper. Excellent work!

    • Reply
      Rachel
      May 9, 2014 at 11:19 pm

      Thanks, Kristi! I’m glad you’re enjoying it. 🙂

  • Reply
    Chinda Sengsuwan
    May 9, 2014 at 9:01 am

    Rachel, you’re a very good teacher. I like the way you tackle crisis. But, are you really going to leave this profession?

    • Reply
      Rachel
      May 9, 2014 at 11:18 pm

      Thanks so much! I will be staying in education, but I want to leave the classroom for a few years while my son is little. 🙂

  • Reply
    Chinda Sengsuwan
    May 9, 2014 at 9:01 am

    Rachel, you’re a very good teacher. I like the way you tackle crisis. But, are you really going to leave this profession?

    • Reply
      Rachel
      May 9, 2014 at 11:18 pm

      Thanks so much! I will be staying in education, but I want to leave the classroom for a few years while my son is little. 🙂

  • Reply
    Elizabeth Thao
    May 15, 2014 at 11:04 pm

    Such a beautiful story, Rachel. I happen to love those “superpower” t-shirts and stickers. In the moments, the power isn’t as apparent, but it’s always when teachers tell the story that the powers become salient 🙂

  • Reply
    Elizabeth Thao
    May 15, 2014 at 11:04 pm

    Such a beautiful story, Rachel. I happen to love those “superpower” t-shirts and stickers. In the moments, the power isn’t as apparent, but it’s always when teachers tell the story that the powers become salient 🙂

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