Education Teaching

Minding Your Own Business

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For my third year of teaching, along with switching schools for the third time, I also started teaching third grade. Previously I had identified as a middle school teacher, ending the day reeking of sixth and seventh grade hormone dust, much to the chagrin of my roommates. The transition to becoming a third grade teacher was, let’s just say, tearful. For everyone involved.

For starters, third graders are tattle-tales. The neighborhood rubbernecker has nothing on a third grade student. They are relentless in their scrutiny of their peers, and itch for the moment to tell on anyone who falls out of line. This can be tiresome. Multiply it by thirty students and it is downright exhausting.

The result: I coined my first third grade teacher catch phrase. After intentional instruction and “family meetings” with my students on the rug, the mantra we created and reiterated was, “If, for the rest of your life you only worry about yourself, that will be enough.”

This provided plenty of humor when students would come up to me and say, “I know I’m supposed to be worrying about myself, but Anaya just ate the eraser on her pencil.” But oddly enough, making this part of the daily rhetoric helped calm down the tattling, and helped steer the conversation toward self-reflection, a skill that has recently been difficult for me.

I’m generally a reflective person. Probably an overly reflective person. I’m the person who reflects on my reflecting. I have full conversations play out in my head and have, on more than one occasion, been known to make hand motions or facial expressions in fitting with my rehashing of an event. I promise I’m not crazy. Well, not too crazy.

But lately there’s been some stuff going on. Lots of big life changes. Family members are moving to other countries. I’m missing my parents, who live 400 miles away. The routines of my job are not automatic, so the mental requirement is taxing, and I’m examining every movement under a microscope. Reflecting on my reflecting, if you will.

While this has been going on, I’ve noticed a trend. The more stuff going on in my personal life, the more pissed off I get at the news. Mind you, there is always plenty in the news to get worked up about. It never disappoints. But a lot of the time I can still find that inner calm and resolve, keep chipping away at my piece of work to do, my part in creating the world I want to see. Or something like that.

Not lately. Lately I’ve been seeing Facebook status updates and having twenty minute rants to my husband, or my friends, or the check out person at the grocery store. No seriously. Lately I’ve been seeking out information from friends that will allow me to get opinionated and ornery. Lately I want to get out my measuring stick and start whacking knuckles to keep everyone in line.

There’s this rush I get when I am angry. It’s heady and powerful. There’s something so satisfying about identifying as righteous and holding myself a full two feet (two hundred feet) above everyone else.

So anyway, I go to church, at least a couple of Sundays a month, and one of the things that we talk about in church is when Jesus says to look at the log in your own eye before being concerned about the fleck of dust in your neighbor’s eye. And I think it’s pretty amazing how easy it is to see those small flecks in everyone else’s eyes, and how hard it is to notice the log in my own, weighing me down day after day.

Put another way, by my favorite Ani Difranco, “I’ve got something to prove, as long as I’ve got something that needs improvement.”

Maybe part of it is that it is so much easier to feel powerful than to feel powerless. It’s so much easier to look at Facebook and the world news and pronounce myself the arbitrator of right and wrong, and hypothesize whether or not our country should go to war than it is to do the pile of dishes that has migrated its way into our living room.

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It’s so much easier to look at my friend’s financial decisions and raise my eyebrows and shake my head than it is to reflect on whether or not we should be eating out for the fourth day this week.

It’s so much easier to look out than to look in.

This past week I have been coaching first year teachers. There have been so many surprises, so many ways in which the teachers have already surpassed my expectations of what it means to teach for a first year (my expectations being set, of course, at the most basic, fall on your face level of my first year). There has been one refrain I’ve heard over and over.

“They are (fill in number here) graders. They should know how to act by now!”

My response has stayed the same. Maybe they should know how to do this by now. But let’s say that they don’t. Let’s say that they don’t know how to do this. How are you going to teach them?

Because, after all, there’s a lot of things I should know by now.

I should probably know by now how to worry about myself. I should know how to spend time in quiet and reflection. I should know how to cry when I am sad and how to laugh when I’m happy and how to hold other people in love and kindness. And sometimes I do. And sometimes I don’t.

Thankfully, I’ve had a lot of good teachers in my life, ones who have assumed that regardless of what I should know, sometimes I need to be taught again.

I have teachers who remind me what it is to be the person I am, the person I want to be. Like my husband gently reminding me that the first week of the school year is always impossible. Or Karen reminding me that it never hurts to go out for a walk. And Lenora telling me that maybe it’s time to lay off of Facebook for a little while, at least until a little balance returns to my life. My teachers step in and tell me it’s time to put down the measuring stick, all the knuckles are broken.

In short, they remind me that If, for the rest of my life I only worry about myself, that will be enough.

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I’m going to a bonfire tonight.  And I certainly have some firewood to contribute, at least metaphorically speaking.

261755_10150290602379874_2436766_nRachel

 

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18 Comments

  • Reply
    Judith
    September 13, 2014 at 5:52 pm

    “I’m going to a bonfire tonight. And I certainly have some firewood to contribute, at least metaphorically speaking.” Words for reflecting on my (recent) reflections. I have so much that needs to go in the fire right now…the fireplace if not a bonfire. Thanks as always.

    • Reply
      Rachel
      September 13, 2014 at 8:07 pm

      Thank you! So much to reflect on, that’s for sure. Time to start chopping…

  • Reply
    Judith
    September 13, 2014 at 5:52 pm

    “I’m going to a bonfire tonight. And I certainly have some firewood to contribute, at least metaphorically speaking.” Words for reflecting on my (recent) reflections. I have so much that needs to go in the fire right now…the fireplace if not a bonfire. Thanks as always.

    • Reply
      Rachel
      September 13, 2014 at 8:07 pm

      Thank you! So much to reflect on, that’s for sure. Time to start chopping…

  • Reply
    daniellemruff
    September 13, 2014 at 7:43 pm

    I also teach third grade and cannot stand tattling. I typically ask,” are you bleeding? Is the room on fire? Did you throw up?”. Just wanted to share a thought.

    • Reply
      Rachel
      September 13, 2014 at 8:07 pm

      Haha, all of those words have come out of my mouth!! Thanks for commenting. 🙂

  • Reply
    daniellemruff
    September 13, 2014 at 7:43 pm

    I also teach third grade and cannot stand tattling. I typically ask,” are you bleeding? Is the room on fire? Did you throw up?”. Just wanted to share a thought.

    • Reply
      Rachel
      September 13, 2014 at 8:07 pm

      Haha, all of those words have come out of my mouth!! Thanks for commenting. 🙂

  • Reply
    Lori
    September 13, 2014 at 8:21 pm

    Always enjoy your blog, Rachel. Thanks for sharing and bring vulnerable. Love you.

    • Reply
      Lori
      September 13, 2014 at 8:24 pm

      Obviously, that should be “being” not bring. Swype gets me again. I guess we could say, “bring on vulnerability.” 🙂

      • Reply
        Rachel
        September 13, 2014 at 8:40 pm

        Thanks, Lori! And yes, let’s bring on the vulnerability.

  • Reply
    Lori
    September 13, 2014 at 8:21 pm

    Always enjoy your blog, Rachel. Thanks for sharing and bring vulnerable. Love you.

    • Reply
      Lori
      September 13, 2014 at 8:24 pm

      Obviously, that should be “being” not bring. Swype gets me again. I guess we could say, “bring on vulnerability.” 🙂

      • Reply
        Rachel
        September 13, 2014 at 8:40 pm

        Thanks, Lori! And yes, let’s bring on the vulnerability.

  • Reply
    Karen
    September 14, 2014 at 2:07 am

    Rachel, I think you captured how I’ve been feeling lately and my need to disengage with so many. I feel that I cannot speak, because if I were to share the depth of my despair and anger over what is happening in so many places, I would probably be locked up! Facebook statuses or shares or sometimes even mere “likes” can stoke my ire or fire or both – as can exhaustion and feeling overwhelmed. Closing the computer, turning off the phone and walking or running or smashing tennis balls into a wall can help me refocus so I’m not running about righting the wrongs I uncover in the book of faces. Thank you for writing this and reminding me that I am not alone.

    I wish I’d been home for your bonfire. <3

    • Reply
      Rachel
      September 14, 2014 at 6:10 am

      I kept thinking about what Anne Lamott says about being pretty sure you’ve created God in your own image when he hates all the same people you do. LOL. Sigh. Guess it’s time for a walk. And there will be more bonfires. 🙂

  • Reply
    Karen
    September 14, 2014 at 2:07 am

    Rachel, I think you captured how I’ve been feeling lately and my need to disengage with so many. I feel that I cannot speak, because if I were to share the depth of my despair and anger over what is happening in so many places, I would probably be locked up! Facebook statuses or shares or sometimes even mere “likes” can stoke my ire or fire or both – as can exhaustion and feeling overwhelmed. Closing the computer, turning off the phone and walking or running or smashing tennis balls into a wall can help me refocus so I’m not running about righting the wrongs I uncover in the book of faces. Thank you for writing this and reminding me that I am not alone.

    I wish I’d been home for your bonfire. <3

    • Reply
      Rachel
      September 14, 2014 at 6:10 am

      I kept thinking about what Anne Lamott says about being pretty sure you’ve created God in your own image when he hates all the same people you do. LOL. Sigh. Guess it’s time for a walk. And there will be more bonfires. 🙂

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