fathering mothering PARENTING

Will You Be My Friend?

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It’s been a long last couple months. It started when my son projectile vomited all over me at my husband’s thirty-first birthday dinner. His parents took us to one of our favorite Italian restaurants to celebrate. We had just finished the first course of the chef’s tasting menu when my son reached for me, nestled his head into my shoulder, then pulled back to look me straight in the face. It was a sweet moment. Then he threw up for what seemed like hours onto the entire front of my body until I was sufficiently soaked in his vomit. The waiter came by moments later with our next course. I wasn’t hungry. (Though I did manage to finish my martini.)

The sicknesses passed from one to another of us over the next six weeks, culminating in a trip to the ER and the determination that my son will no longer be receiving drugs in the penicillin family.

People have been asking me how my “holidays” went, and I either say fine, or say way too much, their eyes glazing over thirty seconds into my ER story.

Let’s just say, in the words of Counting Crow’s Adam Duritz, “A long December, and there’s reason to believe maybe this year will be better than the last…”

So I hadn’t been feeling my best self. For awhile. In fact, that night when we decided to take our son to the ER, as I pulled my son’s pants off to change his diaper and saw a full body rash and swollen limbs hot to the touch, my exact and immediate response fell solidly into the expletive category. Well, expletives and tears. Which would probably be my band name if I ever formed a band.

What followed was a night of holding my screaming, beautiful baby boy while he was stuck with needles and having thermometers shoved into his rear end (there has GOT to be a better way to take a temperature, accuracy or not), while trying to interpret the doctor’s well-meaning but overly technical jargon at one in the morning. (Is it that hard to say fever instead of febrile? Seriously?) It all left me a little bit crusty. Or crustier.

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We had emailed friends to tell them about our ER experience and ask them to pray, and so many friends emailed back and told us they were thinking of us and praying for us. Most of the emails ended with, “Let us know if we can do anything to help.”

I was touched by the immediate email responses from our friends, reading them each to my husband. And then Crusty piped in with her thoughts. “Really? What can you do to help? Come hold our kid for a few hours so we can get some sleep!”

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Without missing a beat my husband (who loves both Rachel and Crusty) replied, “I bet there at least five people who would be willing to come over right now and do that if we asked.”

I didn’t ask.

But he was right. There are at least that many friends who would make time to help us, even at an inconvenience to themselves. So why is it so hard to ask?

My husband I met at church, and got to know one another through a church small group called Faith For Life, where we discussed the Rule of Saint Benedict, hospitality, and spiritual disciplines. I know, words like disciplines are so unbelievably not fun. It reminds me of spankings, dread, and not being able to eat chocolate.

However, one of the disciplines we discussed was asking for help. And we agreed to ask one another for help at least once a week for that summer, to practice what it was like to admit that maybe, just maybe, we can’t do it all on our own. Sometimes we have to reach out for the hand of a friend.

My one attempt to ask for help that summer was to call my husband for directions. This was before Siri could do that for me.

So it turns out that I am really really not good at asking for help. Like really, really not good. And it also turns out that being a parent has made the moments when I need help cluster together like grapes on a vine. (Which is obviously a coincidence and has absolutely nothing to do with life handing me the lessons I need to learn.)

It’s just so hard to be the needy one. It’s hard to be the one who has to ask, who has to kneel. It’s hard to admit that I DO care what people think, that I care deeply if my friends love me. My friends and I joke about “The Friendship Bank”, and I desperately want to be the one with the most money in the bank, and I’m always afraid I’m instead the one making the most withdrawals.

But I also think my fear of those things keeps me from the intimacy and friendship I might have if I was willing to stop keeping score, willing to reach out a little more often, even if all I have is a wrapped present full of my need.

Last Sunday some couples from my church got together, and shortly before leaving I turned to two of my favorite friends, looked them in the eyes and said, “It’s been a hard couple months and I have been avoiding everyone. And I really need connection and my friends. Will you two pursue me?”

They laughed, because who says that?

But they said yes. And last Tuesday we went out to have sushi. And they told me that if I had called them, they would have come to hold our son while we napped.

I’ve had a wonderful few days since then. Which I think is probably related.

So don’t be surprised if your phone rings sometime soon. It might just be Crusty asking for some help.

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8 Comments

  • Reply
    Leslie Foster
    January 15, 2015 at 11:38 pm

    Good work becoming a healthier person, Crusty. You’re doing great. Keep asking. Keep letting people get close. Close is good (unless we’re discussing projectile vomiting again. And I hope we aren’t…

    • Reply
      Rachel
      January 16, 2015 at 4:03 am

      Thanks, Resaree!! It’s good stuff, except for the vomiting part. 🙂

  • Reply
    Leslie Foster
    January 15, 2015 at 11:38 pm

    Good work becoming a healthier person, Crusty. You’re doing great. Keep asking. Keep letting people get close. Close is good (unless we’re discussing projectile vomiting again. And I hope we aren’t…

    • Reply
      Rachel
      January 16, 2015 at 4:03 am

      Thanks, Resaree!! It’s good stuff, except for the vomiting part. 🙂

  • Reply
    My Screen-Free Bedroom (And the 4 Best Ways It’s Changed My Life) | Teacher. Reader. Mom.
    January 30, 2015 at 4:28 am

    […] ← Will You Be My Friend? […]

  • Reply
    My Screen-Free Bedroom (And the 4 Best Ways It’s Changed My Life) | Teacher. Reader. Mom.
    January 30, 2015 at 4:28 am

    […] ← Will You Be My Friend? […]

  • Reply
    Kat
    February 12, 2015 at 5:11 am

    I’ve had your blog entry in my “to read” list for a few weeks now. And today I finally had (or took) the time to read. Rach, this so resonates with me. Maybe not the asking for help part (although I also think I might not be so good at that), but this need for connection. I think it’s incredible that you asked your friends yo pursue you! I think we need that and so many are hard pressed to ever ask! It encourages me to do it too. 🙂
    Oh and also, I too was vomited on today by my 13 month old. What. The. Crap.

  • Reply
    Kat
    February 12, 2015 at 5:11 am

    I’ve had your blog entry in my “to read” list for a few weeks now. And today I finally had (or took) the time to read. Rach, this so resonates with me. Maybe not the asking for help part (although I also think I might not be so good at that), but this need for connection. I think it’s incredible that you asked your friends yo pursue you! I think we need that and so many are hard pressed to ever ask! It encourages me to do it too. 🙂
    Oh and also, I too was vomited on today by my 13 month old. What. The. Crap.

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